Faithful or Familiar?

We have been looking at problems and addictions. In particular, addiction to technology. And we saw recently in the story of the Pool of Bethesda (John 5:1-15) that we are in need of answering Jesus’ question: “Do you want to get well?” (John 5:6).

Often we realize that we have a problem – an addiction, a relational issue with someone we care about, a situation at work. Or the one we have focused on a lot recently in these blogs – spending too much time and giving too much attention to technology – your cell phone, tablet, computer, laptop, or the multitude of channels you can watch on cable television and streaming services. And we saw that often we have become so comfortable with the problem that we simply don’t want to change. Or, ‘get well’.

But the question Jesus asks is still valid today: “Do you want to get well?”

About 6 weeks ago I invited a number of believers to supper is my yard … an outdoor chilli and buns supper and coffee conversation. I noticed that one man spent the first 40 minutes staring at his cell phone. He did not engage in the conversation. He was not attentive to what was going on around him. He was not entering into the fellowship. And, throughout the evening he continued to reference his cell phone on a consistent basis. When he left he had literally engaged with only one person. And that person came to him and engaged him in a conversation. If that had not happened the man would have left without exchanging anything of significance with anyone else. It would have been like he was not there – because other than physically, he was not there. I have spoken to him many times about ‘engaging’ and ‘embracing’ but to no avail it seems. He apparently does not want to change.

Maybe you can sense the Spirit of God posing Jesus’ question to you. Do you want to change and get well?

Do you want to get well? Do you really? Do you want to enjoy the blessing of technology without being a slave to it? Are you willing to do whatever it takes to put God first in your life?

Someone once asked, “What do you thing is the greatest hindrance to faith?” Lots of possibilities come to mind. Worry is certainly a hindrance to faith, right? So is doubt. You could also argue that fear really undermines faith. And God has not given his a spirit of fear (2 Timothy 1:7 NLT). But as I pondered all these contenders, another one came to mind that is less obvious, but just as dangerous. 

Perhaps the familiar is the greatest enemy to faith.

Instead of believing that God can do anything, many surrender to what they can see. They accept what is instead of what could be. Maybe you’ve become comfortable with your addiction to technology. You’ve learned to rationalize it, to explain it away. You tell yourself it’s really not that big a deal. Maybe everyone you know is a lot like you, so it couldn’t be that bad, could it?

Perhaps the familiar, what you know and accept, is the greatest obstacle to your faith. Faith in what could be. Faith in what God calls you to be.

The invalid at the Pool of Bethesda could have argued, “I’ve never been able to walk. I’ve always been dependent on others. No one will ever help me.” You might have your excuses: “I’ve got to be on my phone 24/7. If I’m not, how will they reach me? I have to stay in touch with what’s going on. I can’t do my job without my phone.”

If the familiar is the greatest obstacle to faith, then it takes faith to step away from the familiar.

Maybe that’s why Jesus asked the invalid, “Do you want to get well?” Maybe that’s why you can sense His Spirit asking you the same question. Do you want to enjoy the benefits of technology without being ensnared by the curses? Do you really want to change? Do you really want to be well?

Because you can’t help someone who needs help.

You can only help someone who wants help.

Do you want to be free?

You have to want it. Really want it.

The healing will not begin until your desire is greater than your disability.

When you finally realizer that you want to be well more than you want to be wired (or whatever your addiction is), then you’ve opened the door for God to work in your life. If you’re tired of surfing, trying to fill the hole in your heart that only Jesus can fill, then it’s time for healing. If you’re sick of being a slave to the latest operating system or to having a Wi-Fi connection at a restaurant, and you’re ready to do something about it, then you’ve taken the first step. 

Addictions are not easy to overcome. It is only when your desire for healing becomes greater than your disability that God can begin to set you free. 

Maybe you are addicted, hooked, and have been struggling to be free for some time. I don’t know how long you’ve been down, but with Christ you’re not out.

Like the man at the Pool of Bethesda it is time to stop making excuses and start getting well. When he looked at the crippled man, “Jesus said to him, ‘Get up! Pick up your mat and walk.’ At once the man was cured; he picked up his mat and walked” (John 5:8-9 emphasis added). Jesus didn’t heal the man a month later; it happened immediately. In the same way, when you surrender your challenge (addiction) to Jesus, He can do more in that moment than you can ever imagine., You might not feel any different, and the change might not happen all at once, but Jesus’ power will be working in you.

Jesus told the invalid to get up and start walking, That’s a pretty hefty assignment for a guy who most likely had never walked in his life. Jesus told him to do what everyone else would have considered impossible.

Notice that the guy didn’t even ask Jesus to heal him. Jesus just did it because He’s Jesus. When you get close to Jesus, He will do things you don’t even ask Him to do. He’s just that good.

Jesus essentially said, “I don’t want to hear your excuses. I want to see your faith.”

And He is speaking to you right now telling you that you have to let go of the familiar (what you are comfortable with) as it is an enemy of faith and without faith you cannot please God.

So, this blog is longer than most. So let me close by saying…

When you occasionally (or often) unplug from technology, you will find true rest for your soul. When you make pleasant boundaries, you will be making wise choices to keep your eyes, mind, and heart pure. You will not put anything ahead of God. When others are tempted to tear people down, you will break from the crowd and follow God, who has called you to build others up.

As you remove the blanket of excuses and follow God’s leading, you will be healed and delivered; transformed into the image of Christ.

Do you want to get well?

Then let Jesus heal you.

He is more powerful than any struggles you will ever face.