No Other Gods But God Only!

Speaking to people today it appears that they have numerous – and often many – gods before God Almighty. They worship money and all that it can do for them. The pleasure it can bring. They put technology before God and spend more time posting on Facebook and Instagram than they spend in God’s Word and in His presence. They have a seriously dysfunctional relationship with their followers on Facebook, their phones, and their many social apps. But they don’t care. They know something should change. But they just shrug it off. They think, “I’m fine with it. I like it. This is just my thing. Even if it’s wrong, even if God has something better for me, I don’t care.”

In the Old Testament, Gideon faced a similar problem with the people around him. They willingly bowed to idols and thumbed their noses at God in the process. But God was having none of it. With righteous passion, He told Gideon, “Tear down your father’s altar to Baal and cut down the Asherah pole beside it” (Judges 6:25). Notice that God didn’t tell Gideon to help the people manage their idols, to shorten them by a few feet, just keep them under control. No, He commanded Gideon to tear them down. Cut down the poles. Don’t tolerate the idols. Crush them. Destroy them. Smash them. Obliterate them.

If you know your unhealthy obsessions are interfering with your most important relationships — with people or with God — it’s time to act.

Today.

This moment.

Now.

God doesn’t want you to have any gods before Him. Not a single one. God longs for you to know Him, to enjoy His constant presence and goodness, to walk by His Spirit, and to live in His love.

When Jesus saw a rich guy who idolized his money and things, Scripture says, “Jesus looked at him and loved him. ‘One thing you lack, He said. ‘Go, sell everything you have and give to the poor, and you will have treasure in heaven. Then come, follow Me’” (Mark 10:21 emphasis added).

Don’t miss Jesus’ motivation here for asking so much of this rich young guy. Jesus didn’t tell the young man to give all his money to Him and to His disciples, or to the building fund for the new temple. Jesus simply loved him. Do you see that? Jesus loved him. And Jesus loves you more than you can imagine. He doesn’t want you to allow yourself to be seduced into settling for something counterfeit. He wants you to embrace His grace, satisfied in your soul, because He is not only all you need but more than you can imagine. 

It’s interesting to me that at least in the Gospel record, Jesus didn’t tell anyone else to sell everything snd give away all their money. This is the only time that Jesus gives such a specific command. Why did He tell this guy and no one else to get rid of everything? It’s not because God doesn’t want us to have money and things; it’s that He doesn’t want money and things to have us. Without question, the things of this world had this rich man’s heart. They consumed him. He’d been seduced. And because Jesus loved him, He wanted him to have something better. So He commanded him to get rid of his idols and follow Him.

If you sense the Spirit of God nudging you (or maybe it’s more like a kick in the cursor), don’t ignore Him. He loves you. If your soul has been seduced into serving a counterfeit god, the one true God wants something better for you.

But gaining the better requires tearing down the idol.

Don’t manage it.

Destroy it. 

Living With Hope and Certainty!

A lot of people today have the understanding that it really does not matter what you believe as long as you are sincere in what it is you say you believe. Of course this plays well until we come to the place in life when we are genuinely facing our own possible death. Then what we believe immediately comes into sharper focus and becomes seriously important.

What you believe should shape the lifestyle you live. But what you believe – sincere or not – will seriously shape your “life after death.” So, it is important to review your foundational beliefs and understandings. And, may I be so bold as to suggest, check them again what the Christian faith and the Bible sets forth as truth. Even if you are not a Christian you might still take a look at what the Bible teaches about death and life after death. Just to give yourself a context and something to bounce your own beliefs off of at such an important time. 

I just read Alex Trebek’s autobiography “The Answer Is… Reflections on my life.” He is the host of the long-running game show “Jeopardy.” The back of the dust jacket reads: “I believe in the will to live. I believe in the power of positivity. I believe in optimism. I believe in hope.” Caught my interest and so I took the time to read what is an amazing story and a well written book. 

In the last few pages of the book, the author writes of his current battle with terminal cancer. He writes…

“But when death happens, it happens. Why should I be afraid of it? Now, if it involves physical suffering, I might be afraid of that. But, according to my doctor, that’s what hospice is for.

They want to make it as easy as it can possibly be for you to transition into whatever future you happen to believe in. Am I a believer? Well, I believe we are all part of the Great Soul — what some call God. We are God, and God is us. We are one with our maker. How do I know this? It’s not that I know it. It’s that I feel it … I feel it in my gut.

But do I pray to a specific God? Do I anticipate a particular version of the afterlife? No, I do not. For all I know I’ll wind up coming back in another life as a knitter during the French Revolution sitting there like Madame Defarge watching the executions. However, lately I’ve been thinking more and more about that old line they used in the military: “No one’s an atheist in a foxhole.” If ever there was an opportunity to believe in God — a god — this might be a good one. Trebek, now that you’re on the verge. What have you got to lose?”

“The Answer Is…” page 284

Like the author I believe in the will to live. I believe in the power of positivity. I believe in optimism. I believe in hope. But my hope is anchored in my Christian faith. It is based on the words of Jesus who is God in human flesh. It is based on His death and the resulting forgiveness of my sins. And on His resurrection proving He is who He says He is and giving us the hope – really the deep knowledge – that there is life after death. A life in Heaven with Him where we will experience the fullness of His life and actually be all He created us to be. I certainly don’t believe in the “Great Soul” and that “we are God and God is us.” 

Paul an apostle in the Church wrote (1 Corinthians 15) that because Christ has been raised from the dead we can live with hope now in this life. But “if in this life only we have hoped in Christ, we are of all people most to be pitied” (15:19). Why? Because our hope is also anchored in the historical fact that Christ was raised from the dead and is alive. “But in fact Christ has been raised from the dead…” (15:20a). So, we not only live with hope now but we live with the hope and knowledge of life after death. 

We don’t have to guess what this might be like. The Bible and our Saviour Jesus is very clear what life after death is like – both for the true believer and for the non-believer. It is not based on living according to what you “sincerely believe.” It is based on the death and resurrection of Jesus Christ and having a personal relationship with Him now in this life – day-by-day. Our hope is founded upon the sure and certain fact that Jesus is God and that He died for our sins and was raised again from the dead and is alive today. That we can have a personal relationship with Him as our Lord and Saviour and thus live life with hope and die knowing (not a gut feeling) that He will welcome us into Heaven where there is a place reserved and ready for us as His children. 

  STEP OUT IN FAITH (Overcoming Feeble and Frozen Faith)

Walter invited his good friend Arthur to take a ride with him out into the county. They drove past groves of fruit trees and dilapidated shacks to an area that looked to Arthur like a barren wasteland. Walter began telling his friend about the exciting plans he had for this boring parcel of land southeast of downtown Los Angeles, California. Walter’s express purpose was to give Arthur the opportunity to become an investor in his dream.
Walter had enough money for the main project, but he wanted to ensure that the land surrounding his venture would be bought up at the same time. He was confident that within five years the whole area would be filled with hotels, restaurants, and even a convention center serving the throngs of people who came to visit his development.
But Walter’s friend, radio and television personality Art Linkletter (born a Canadian but living in the United States), could not see the potential and turned down the opportunity to buy up the area of land that now surrounds Disneyland, the dream of his friend, Walt Disney. Today that “barren wasteland” in Orange County, California, is worth billons of dollars.

Read more

SOMETIMES I FEEL INCREDIBLY LONELY

When God created the world, He declared that everything was good (Genesis, Chapter 1)
The sun, the earth, the moon, and the stars — all good!
He was pleased
Pleased with the animals
Pleased with the mountains
Pleased with the oceans
Pleased with the trees
Above all, God was most proud of His best work: Man (“very good”)

Read more

A Time to Refocus and Reprioritize – Part Two

Continuing on from yesterday…

You might not be obsessed with your phone (or with money or things or whatever). But if you’re like most of us, you’re coming dangerously close to idolizing yourself. Disguised and subverted in our reverence for technology is this sense that it empowers us to do anything we want to do. Yep, those commercials for the latest phone, app, tablet, or laptop might as well promise superpowers.

Approximately 80 percent of what people do on social media pertains to themselves. This is why I say we might have an issue (problem) with idolizing ourselves. Think about the whole notion of selfies for a minute, a phenomenon that still fascinates and repulses me in equal measure, like some roadside accident on the information superhighway. I don’t think the word selfie even exited a decade ago. Yet in 2013, the Oxford dictionary crowned it as their “word of the year.” Seemingly out of nowhere, selfies have become an obsession for so many.

Pamela Rutledge said on PsychologyToday.com, “Selfies frequently trigger perceptions of self-indulgence to attention-seeking social dependence that raises the damned-if-you-do and damned-if-you-don’t spectrum of either narcissism or very low self esteem.” It’s not unusual for selfies to fill the vast majority of most teens’ Instagram albums. This may be ‘normal,’ but it’s certainly not healthy.

This story makes me unbelievably sad:

Danny Bowman [a British teenager] says he became so obsessed with trying to capture just the “right” selfie that he ended up shooting about 200 pictures a day trying desperately to get a perfect representation of himself. And when Bowman failed to take what he perceived to be the perfect selfie, he attempted suicide with an overdose of drugs. Prior to his suicide attempt, Bowman says, he estimated he spent about ten hours every day taking selfies.”

When we contrast self-centredness with what God requires — selfless surrender — the difference is striking. Jesus didn’t say, “To be My disciples, you must promote yourself.” He says just the opposite. Jesus boldly proclaims, “Whoever wants to be My disciple must deny themselves and take up their cross and follow Me. (Matthew 16:24 emphasis added).

Our culture says show yourself. Jesus says deny yourself.

If people looked at your Facebook page, your Instagram pictures, to your most recent tweets, what will they see? Look over what you’ve posted, pinned, and tweeted in the past week or so and be as objective as you can. Do you see a humble, other-focused, Christ-centered disciple? Or do you see someone other than who Christ as called you to be?

So, to be honest, if you are checking multiple times a day to see what people are saying about you, let’s call that what it is: idolatry. If your identity comes more from who follows you, who Likes you, what they say and what they think about you rather than who God says you are, it’s time to refocus and reprioritize.

Of you might be a person who compulsively checks emails. Any time you see one come in, you just have to know what it says — immediately. Or maybe any time your phone buzzes, beeps, or dings, it draws you by some seemingly unstoppable force. If so, pause to consider: Are you drawn to the things of God in the same way? Or has the magnetic force of your phone become a stronger force in your life than the promised present of God?

Most young people know that their obsession is distracting them from God. Let me ask you to be honest. Do you think more about what God says in His Word or what people say on your feed? How much time do you think about God versus what to say online? Work hard to tell the truth. No matter how tempting it is to ignore Him, if God is trying to get your attention, don’t  shake Him off.

Have you made a good thing into a supreme thing, even above God?

David asks this question and then, inspired by God, he answered it:  “Who may ascend the hill of the Lord? Who may stand in his holy place? He who has clean hands and a pure heart,

who does not lift up his soul to an idol or swear by what is false” (Psalm 245:3-4 NIV 1984). This imagery of lifting our souls to an idol strikes me. Are we trading our worship of the Trinity for something more along the lines of 5G LTE?

Is it possible that our soul, the part of us that no one sees but God, is secretly elevating our online presence above His eternal presence? Are we constantly pursuing something evasive? A black hole of empty promises? Are we believing that more of something other than God will fulfill us, satisfy us, and bring meaning to our lives? Is it possible that we’ve lifted our soul to an online idol? If we have, our soul still longs for more.

God is a jealous God. He wants to be first, above all else in our hearts and lives. So be honest about social media, or any other area of your life that you have put above God. It’s time to tear the idols down. 

And it is a time to refocus and reprioritize in your life right now. A time to take a deep, honest look at who you present yourself to be and then who you really are. Contrast those two pictures with whom Jesus calls you to be. Yup! Tine to make some changes and adjustments. 

A Time to Refocus and Reprioritize – Part One

I spent some serious time in the summer months refocusing and reprioritizing. My life is lived most days in the fast lane. There is always much to accomplish and many things demanding my attention. And so with all the demands on my time and energy I find it helpful to occasionally take some time to see how my soul is doing and make whatever changes are needed to get back into a healthy place where my soul can prosper once again (3 John 2).

So my question today is: Are we placing too much value on something that’s not that important? Are we bowing down and worshiping something besides God? Some examples: Ministry; Social media; Entertainment; Work; Success. Have we fallen into a new dimension of sin? Are our souls being seduced by all the pressures of the face-paced world that we live in?

Jesus asked the question: “What good is it for someone to gain the whole world, yet forfeit their soul?” (Mark 8:36). We can adjust the question to today’s culture: what good is it to get more followers, more Likes, more comments, more Pinterest pins, and yet forfeit our soul?

Is anything worth more than having a growing passion for our loving Heavenly Father? I don’t think so.

And neither does God, who clearly doesn’t pull any punches. With ultimate directness He says, “You shall have no other gods before me. You shall not make for yourself an image in the form of anything in heaven above or on the earth beneath or in the waters below. You shall not bow down to them or worship them; for I, the Lord your God, am a jealous God…” (Exodus 20:3-5a)

That’s pretty straightforward.

“You shall gave no other gods before Me.”

God wants to be first in our lives. Second place is not acceptable. It’s not sinful for God to be jealous in this way because for Him, this is a holy jealousy, a righteous longing for our whole heart.

Why is it wrong to put other people or things before God? First, we need to realize that God is holy, eternal, omnipotent, and sovereign. He’s … well … God, and we most definitely are not. Because He is God, He must be first. We need to understand that we are not a body with a soul. We are a soul with a body. Our bodies will die, but our souls will live forever. Our souls were created by God to be in intimate relationship with Him. Our souls are created to know God, love Him, worship Him, and do life with Him. That’s why we must guard the affections of our soul and put Him first.

Our souls can be seduced. We can be distracted. The pollution of this world can poison the purity of God’s presence, making it harder to find Him and be in relationship with Him. That’s why so many have to search so hard for Him when in a time of need. That is why we try to meet our need for God with other things. But money, or things, or friends, or Likes, or followers, or whatever we think will make us happy never does make us happy. Our news feeds can be full, but our hearts and souls empty. Anytime we allow our souls to be consumed with anything other than God, we will never be satisfied.

Never. 

So. I take time probably twice a year (summer and Christmas) to have a look at what place God has in my life. Is He still first? What is my primary focus? Is He receiving quality time every day or just the leftovers after a day when the world has been my primary focus. Or ministry has been my focus? Do I allow social media, text messages, and emails to have my instant attention even when it causes me to neglect my soul and spend less quality and focused time with the Lord? What is the condition of my soul? 

We live in soul-scorching times. The mad pace of life and ministry, the number of demands on our time and energy, and the overwhelming torrent of information coming at us 24-7 have left us all ragged, wrung-out, and emptied. This isn’t the life we wanted, so we need to get off the roller coaster, right?

More next time…

What Do You Worship?

The question is “what” do you worship – not “who” do you worship. I am quoting from a book I recently read while on a three week retreat in the north of my province….

And, please note my definition of idolatry. Idolatry is taking something — anything — and making it more important than it should be in our lives.

A friend of mine who visited a remote, impoverished village in India told me a story. He saw a woman sacrificing a chicken as an act of worship to her god. My friend was shocked to see such blatant, modern-day idolatry. After striking up a conversation with the woman, he was impressed with her. She was well-spoken, kind, and educated.

When he learned that she had visited New York City three years earlier, he asked what she thought of America. She explained that she hated it. She had never seen more idolatry anywhere in her entire life. When my friend pressed her, she described three areas of idolatry that she saw.

First, she said, not so gently, the Americans worship their stomachs. Her eyes wide as she talked, this woman from a simple village described the massive stores overstocked with food to sell to people who had already had too much to eat. Evidently this woman was offended by people who are overweight when so many people in her village go hungry. 

Second, she described how Americans worship television. From her perspective, they design their homes around the television. It takes the most prominent place in the most important room, and the furniture is arranged not for talking to people but for watching television. It was almost too much for her to comprehend that some people even allow a television in their bedroom — of all places!

Finally, she said the worst form of idolatry was in the relationship people have with their phones. She was deeply offended that people use them while driving. Even worse was that no one (at least in her experience) could have a full conversation without reading something on their phone.

Kind of gives new meaning to American idol, doesn’t it. My friend didn’t try to disagree with the Indian woman. He knew he couldn’t. Everything she said was true. And she hadn’t even scratched the surface. 

Without getting into our obsessions with food and media, I’m simply raising the question about what we worship when we click. You are probably not putting a statute of a turtle ahead of God, and you probably aren’t a star-worshipper, but is your obsession with your phone gearing out of hand?

Some of us can honestly answer no. We are already using technology with good boundaries. We control it. It doesn’t control us. We might have a healthy view of social media and how we interact with it. If so, I’m thankful, and you should be too!

Yet I know many well-intentioned followers of Jesus who are being seduced, sucked into, and consumed by the virtual world. They think, “I just want to help my business.” Or, “This will give more exposure to my ministry.” Or, “I just love staying in touch with so many friends and family members.” 

As I read this and then took a long walk to think about it I had mixed feelings and several distinct reactions. I was pleased that for several years now I have set boundaries on my iPhone. It turns on at 9:00a. Before that is my time with the Lord, in prayer, reading and studying the Bible. It turns itself off at 10:00p so that I have an uninterrupted 90 minutes to read before heading to bed. I work so many hours in front of the computer screen in my office (9:00a to 1:00p) with emails and texts and then shut it down and go about other things – appointments, meeting with non-believers, and time in my study writing a book I am currently working on.

But I did realize that I needed to put up better boundaries regarding how much time I “waste” watching television some evenings. I realize there are more productive things I can do. But, after a normal day and early evening I am tired and want to simply relax and not have to think. But, that is simply a rationalization and an excuse. So, I have been changing my evening routine and putting my time and limited energy to better use. Establishing boundaries. No longer spending more time binge-watching than I do with the Lord in any given day.

Idolatry is still very much alive in the world today … no matter where you live or what language you speak. And, with all the technology now available idolatry has become an acceptable aspect of life. It is time to reclaim the precious time the Lord given to us each day. 

Remember: Idolatry is taking something — anything — and making it more important than it should be in our lives.

Expect, Endure, Embrace – Part Two

We have been chatting about what should happen when we are persecuted. To start with we should EXPECT to be persecuted when we are living life as followers of Jesus and speaking up for what is right and true. 

Then we saw that Scripture tells us that we must ENDURE the persecution and respond only in love as Jesus did. 

I would make a personal comment here: I have found that if I am earthly-minded and self-centered, I will always feel the sting of critical people. But if I’m walking close to God and my life is His, then by faith I can rise above the smaller-minded criticisms.

If you are facing persecution — or should I say when you face persecution — turn to God. EXPECT persecution. ENDURE persecution. By His power, even EMBRACE it, as Peter advices. “Beloved, do not be surprised at the fiery trial when it comes upon you to test you, as though something strange were happening to you. But rejoice insofar as you share Christ’s sufferings, that you may also rejoice and be glad when his glory is revealed …Yet if anyone suffers as a Christian, let him not be ashamed, but let him glorify God in that name” (1 Peter 4:12-13, 16). Don’t be shocked when persecution comes. Take it another step: EMBRACE it. Rejoice that in some small ways you are counted worthy to suffer with and for the One who suffered for you.

When someone says something cruel about you because of your faith, don’t be ashamed. Instead, thank God that you belong to Jesus. Praise God that He’s chosen you. Never react with some defensive or hateful rebuttal. As you’re led and enabled by the Spirit, either respond in love or realize that you don’t always have to respond. Ultimately God is your Defender. And you live for Him.

Yes, it’s really tough when other people shoot at you. Believe me, I understand. All of us want to be liked by others. When you read a hundred positive comments about something you did and one negative one, which do you focus on most? If you’re like me, it often takes only one negative voice to drown out all the positive ones.

Becoming obsessed with what people think about you is the quickest way to forget what God thinks about you. But the opposite is true as well. If you’re living for Jesus in this selfie-centered world, you know a higher truth: becoming obsessed with what God thinks about you is the quickest way to forget what people think about you.

By faith, rise above the criticism. When persecution comes, EXPECT it. ENDURE it with the One who endured it for you. And by His power, EMBRACE it, thanking God that He is with you.

And that’s the truth. 

Expect, Endure, Embrace – Part One

As a believer and follower of Jesus you should expect persecution from others. That you should expect persecution probably isn’t something you want to hear, but it is something you need to hear. Paul told his younger disciple Timothy, “In fact, everyone who wants to live a godly life in Christ Jesus will be persecuted” (2 Timothy 3:12 emphasis added). Did you see the first word I emphasized? Everyone. No matter who you are, how old you are, or how much you care about others, if you stand up for Jesus, someone will try to shoot you down. Everyone who wants to live a godly life will eventually be persecuted. Don’t be shocked by this. Don’t be discouraged by it. Don’t be overwhelmed by it.

EXPECT it.

Some of your friends may not like what you say on Facebook. They may talk behind your back. They may not invite you to some wild party they’re having. Or you might even be overlooked for a promotion because you follow Jesus. None of these things surprise God. And they shouldn’t surprise you. In fact, Jesus said, “If the world hates you, know that it has hated me before it hated you. If you were of the world, the world would love you as its own; but because you are not of the world, but I chose you out of the world, therefore the world hates you. Remember the word that I said to you: A servant is not greater than his master.’ If they persecuted me, they will also persecute you…” (John 15:18-20a emphasis added) This is why I try never to worry when people shoot at me online for my faith. I actually worry when they don’t.

Not only should you EXPECT people to occasionally (or often) push back on your faith, but also when they do, you should ENDURE it. Paul said, “When we are cursed, we bless; when we are persecuted, we endure it” (1 Corinthians 4:12 emphasis added). Our example is Jesus on the cross. When the creation mocked the Creator, He didn’t whine, gripe, or retaliate. Instead, He prayed for those who mocked and beat Him. Jesus ENDURED it. He rose above it.

When you’re praying for others who are persecuting you, it’s also wise to pray for yourself. If someone attacks, ask God to help you know how — or if — you should respond. Just because they shoot your way doesn’t mean you have to answer. There are times you should answer and other times when you should ignore it. Either way, be careful not to react out of emotion; respond only in love.

While ENDURING persecution, you might reply with a thoughtful or encouraging comment. But remember that social media isn’t a good place for long explanations. Just like a serious theological debate can’t happen in 140 characters or less, it’s hard to solve difficult problems in social media or email. Don’t feel pressured to respond. God can take care of Himself; He doesn’t need you to defend Him every time some online heckler rattles your cage.

When critics flail at you, you aren’t under any obligation to answer. Honestly, I can’t remember the last time I responded to someone hurling bombs my way on social media. I often respond to people who have legitimate questions about the church or something I posted (blogs, articles, teachings). But I won’t debate with people who simply want to pick a fight online. Pray and ask God if He wants you to respond.

I also encourage you to ask God to help you know when to listen and when to dismiss invalid criticism. If someone has a valid point and they’re trying to help you, you should listen. Scripture confirms, “If you listen to constructive criticism, you will be at home among the wise.

If you reject discipline, you only harm yourself;  but if you listen to correction, you grow in understanding” (Proverbs 13:31-32 NLT, emphasis added). But when strangers (or angry people) take cheap shots. You can often disregard what they’re saying and move on. Don’t let that poison seep into your heart.

Some people tend to be naturally critical and negative, but I choose not to let their foul disposition ruin a good day. It’s also helpful to remember that sometimes people are simply hurting. Rather than taking their negative comments personally, I try to let them remind me to pray (in private) that they will experience God’s healing. Peter describes how Jesus modeled this for us: “When he was reviled, he did not revile in return; when he suffered, he did not threaten, but continued entrusting himself to him who judges justly” (1 Peter 2:23 ESV). In the middle of His pain, Jesus din’t fight back. Instead He allowed God to be His defender and submitted Himself to he loving care of His heavenly Father. He call us to do the same. 

More next time… 

Gossip-Free – Part Two

The second set of questions you should ask yourself to avoid gossiping online are equally important. Before sharing your thoughts, ask yourself, “Am I making private matters public? Am I about to share something that would be better handled privately?” In his wisdom, Solomon said, “It is foolish to belittle one’s neighbour; a sensible person keeps quiet. A gossip goes around telling secrets, but those who are trustworthy can keep a confidence” (Proverbs 11:12-13 NLT).

If you share what should be secret, you’re gossiping. 

Before you post anything online, be absolutely certain you’re not making something public that should be private. Do it to protect others. And do it to protect yourself. If you want close friends, you can’t be perceived as a gossip. The Bible says, “When arguing with your neighbour, don’t betray another person’s secret.” Others may accuse you of gossip, and you will never regain a good reputation” (Proverbs 25:9-10 NLT).

Be trustworthy!

Keep what’s private, private.

The third set of questions you’ll want to ask when gossip starts flying begins with this: “Am I permitting — maybe even encouraging — others to gossip?” It’s not only wrong to dish it out; it’s also wrong to eat it up. Scripture is clear: “Wrongdoers eagerly listen to gossip; liars pay close attention to slander” (Proverbs 17:4 NLT). Notice that this verse doesn’t say that only gossipers are wrongdoers. No, it says wrongdoers are also those who “listen to gossip.” It not just wrong to spread gossip; it’s wrong to consume it. Why? Because what you permit, you promote.

Not only should you keep yourself from gossiping, you shouldn’t associate with those who gossip. What is true “in person” is also true online. Because I am a Jesus follower, I do not develop close friendships with gossips; in the same way, I choose to avoid those who continually spray venom online.

Remember, if someone gossips to you, then they’re likely to gossip about you. Stay clear of repeating gossip — and of hearing or seeing it.

If someone is gossiping in person or online, you can be subtle in your approach to avoiding it. You can explain politely that you are not feeling comfortable with the conversation. If that’s not your style, you can take a caring approach. Explain to the gossiper that if __________ (insert names) knew you were talking about them, you would hurt their feelings. (And if you’re talking about them online, there’s a pretty good change they’re going to know.)

Or you could help gossipers take an approach that is consistent with the teachings of Jesus. Remind them of Matthew 18:15-16, that if they have a problem with another brother or sister, they’re supposed to go directly to that person. And if all else fails to stop the gossipers, be direct and make the consequences clear. If they keep it up, you’re not going to hang out with them, anymore (or follow them, or whatever). 

Any time I talk about someone else, whether in person or online, I want my words to be something I’d be willing tp say in their presence. We should answer honestly, Am I about to make private matters public?” When talking or posting, “Are my words helpful or hurtful?” Finally, “Am I permitting or encouraging others to gossip?” What we say (or allow others to say) matters because our words have the power of life and death (Proverbs 18:21). I want my words always to be helpful;, not hurtful. You know that old saying: you’re either part of the problem or you’re part of the solution. By God’s grace, let’s be a part of bringing solutions, not increasing problems.